Treatments

The first thing we will do is an evaluation of the entire body. I believe the body to be one unit and that treating any one part of the body without looking at the system as a whole would be an ineffective strategy. I have found many patients with headache patterns that begin in their hips and many foot pains that are perpetuated by a forward head posture. Had I looked at just one part of the body where the patient is actually feeling the pain I would end up just treating the symptom rather then addressing the root cause. This course of treatment leads to some temporary improvement but with no lasting results. By treating the body as a functional unit we are able to treat symptoms that have eluded other well qualified health professionals. Utilizing this whole body approach our center has successfully treated:

  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Stomach and Intestinal Disorders including Crohns Disease
  • T.M.J. Dysfunction
  • Back Pain (low back, thoracic & upper back)
  • Whiplash Injuries & Neck pain
  • Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Frozen Shoulder
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Breathing Difficulties
  • Headaches
  • Sciatica
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Knee Pain
  • Hip Pain
  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hamstrings/Quadriceps
  • Scoliosis

Carpel Tunnel

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is one of the most common injuries in our society. With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome the person will feel pain, burning sensation, tingling, numbness and weakness or some of the symptoms. He might feel the symptoms in one hand or both.

There are three different nerves which exit the cervical spine, penetrate under the clavicle (Collar bone,) continue into the armpit and into the shoulders, forearms and hands. The nerves are: The Median n, the Ulnar n. and the Radial n.

“These three nerves may be trapped by spastic muscles in the neck, under the collarbone and under the armpit and cause the symptoms mentioned above.”

The muscles, which could be responsible for this dysfunction, are:

  • Scalnus – The Scalenus muscles, which located in front, side and back of the neck, have a powerful impact on neck structure and function. They can straighten the normal neck curvature, or even reverse it. The anterior and lateral scalenus could compress nerves, and will produce pain and radiation (tingling sensation and numbness) to the neck, shoulder, and arm down to the fingers.
  • Supraspinatus – This muscle is originated in the upper part of the scapulae (shoulder blade) and is connected to the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and all the way down the arm to the wrist.
  • Infraspinatus (Rotator cuff muscle) – This muscle covers the lower part of the scapulae (shoulder blade) and is connected to the shoulder joint from the back. When in a spasm the pain would be felt between the scapulae and the spine and down the arm all the way to the fingers.
  • Teres major – This muscle is originated in the lower edge of the scapulae and is connected to the anterior (front) part of the arm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the side of the shoulder and in the back of the forearm.
  • Subscapularis – This muscle is originated in the anterior (front) part of the scapulae and is connected to the front part of the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain would be felt the top and back of the shoulder and down the inner part of the arm and the wrist.
  • Pectoralis Major – This muscle is originated in the chest and is connected to the upper part of the arm from the front. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder, chest and down the inner part of the arm to the elbow area.
  • Pectoralis Minor – This muscle is originated in the third, fourth and fifth ribs in the side of the rib cage. It. is connected to the front tip of the scapulae (coracoid process) in the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain will be felt in the front part of the shoulder, the chest and down the inner arm to the fingers.
  • Subclavius – This muscle is between the 1st rib in the front and the clavicle (collar bone). When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the anterior (front) shoulder and down the arm to the fingers.
  • Biceps Brachi – This muscle is connected between t he arm and the forearm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and down the arm to the thumb.
  • Triceps and Anconeus – These muscles are connected between the shoulder joint and the posterior (back) forearm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and the back of the arm and forearm.
  • Coracobrachialis – This muscle connects the front tip of the scapulae (coracoid process) to the anterior arm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and down the arm to the fingers.
  • Latissimus Dorsi – This muscle originates in the lower back and is connected to the inside of the shoulder. When in a spasm the pain will be felt in the anterior part of the shoulder and the lower back.
  • Forearm flexors and extensors. These muscles originated in the elbow and connected to the wrist and hand. When they are in spasm the symptoms will be felt in the wrist and the hand.

Headaches

Most headaches are caused by lack of oxygen to the brain. The two jugular veins which carry the oxygenated blood to the brain–attached to cervical spine (neck)–penetrate a big cavity at the base of the skull (foramen magnum) and then enter the brain.

These veins could be compressed by certain neck muscles, and compromise the oxygenation to the brain which will result in headaches.

These neck muscles respond to the position of the shoulders. When the shouders move forward, they take the neck and head forward with them, causing the eyes to be directed downwards, towards the floor. However, because of the “righting reflex,” the head must be pulled back to level the eyes. For every inch the head is in front of the shoulders, the neck muscles are forced to work three times harder to support the head.

“The position of the shoulders is determined by the position of the hips because they carry the body’s center of gravity.”

The most common muscles which may cause headaches when they are in a spasm are:

  • The posterior Suboccioital muscles, located in the back of the head, connecting the skull to the 1st and 2nd vertebrae of the neck. When they are spastic they will refer pain to the back of the head, temples and behind the eyes. The anterior Suboccipital muscles, located in the front of the skull which connect the skull to the 1 st and 2nd vertebrae of the neck from the front. When they are spastic they will refer pain to the back of the head and the ears.
  • The Upper Trapezius and Levator Scapulae muscles connect the cervical vertebrae to the shoulder blades (scapulae) and upper thoracic spine. While in a spasm they will produce pain to the back of the neck, to the shoulder and headaches.
  • The S.C.M. (Sternocleidomastoid) muscle is connected from the Clavicle (collar bone) to the side of the neck under the ear. When in spasm it produces headaches, stiff neck, and pain to the jaws, and side of the neck.

The position of the shoulders is determined by the position of the hips because they carry the body’s center of gravity. When the hips are pushed too far forward or backwards while sitting or standing, it will change the position of the shoulders which in turn affects the workload of the neck muscles and make them more suceptible to fatigue, leading to spasm.

Shoulder pain

Shoulder pain can be very confusing. Since many muscles overlapping the shoulder joint from different directions, the cause of the pain could originates from different muscles.

Shoulder pain could be caused by joint dislocation, joint inflammation, muscle tear or muscle spasm. They could happen because excessive activity of muscles, a fall or a blow to the shoulder as in a car accident.

A spastic muscle is a muscle which was forced to contract and lost its ability to stretch. A spastic muscle also resists being exercised, stretched or massaged because these activities will over-stimulate the central nervous system. Once the muscle is in a spasm and its fibers have shortened, it has lost its ability to stretch. The muscle fibers will start to compress blood vessels, compromise blood circulation, entrap nerves, and compress joints.

The muscles, which could cause shoulder pain, are:

  • Scalenes – The Scalenes muscles which located in front, side and back of the neck have a powerful impact on neck structure and function. They can straighten the normal neck curvature, or even reverse it. The anterior and lateral scalenes could compress nerves, and will produce pain and radiation (tingling sensation and numbness) to the neck, shoulder, and arm down to the fingers.
  • Upper Trapezius – The Upper Trapezius and Levator Scapulae muscles connect the cervical vertebrae to the shoulder blades (scapulae) and upper thoracic spine. While in a spasm they will produce pain to the back of the neck, to the shoulder and headaches.
  • Latissimus Dorsi – This muscle originates in the lower back and is connected to the inside of the shoulder. When in a spasm the pain will be felt in the anterior part of the shoulder and the lower back.
  • Deltoid – This muscle overlaps the shoulder joint from the front, back, and the side. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder itself with referred pain down the arm to the elbow.
  • Supraspinatus – This muscle is originated in the upper part of the scapulae (shoulder blade) and is connected to the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and all the way down the arm to the wrist.
  • Infraspinatus (Rotator cuff muscle) – This muscle covers the lower part of the scapulae (shoulder blade) and is connected to the shoulder joint from the back. When in a spasm the pain would be felt between the scapulae and the spine and down the arm all the way to the fingers.
  • Teres minor (Rotator cuff muscle) – This muscle is originated in the lateral (outside) edge of the scapulae and is connected to the back of the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the back and side of the shoulder.
  • Teres major – This muscle is originated in the lower edge of the scapulae and is connected to the anterior (front) part of the arm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the side of the shoulder and in the back of the forearm.
  • Subscapularis – This muscle is originated in the anterior (front) part of the scapulae and is connected to the front part of the shoulder joint. When in a spasm the pain would be felt the top and back of the shoulder and down the inner part of the arm and the wrist.
  • Pectoralis Major – This muscle is originated in the chest and is connected to upper part of the arm from the front. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder, chest and down the inner part of the arm to the elbow area.
  • Pectoralis Minor – This muscle is originated in the third, fourth and fifth ribs in the side of the rib cage. It is connected to the front tip of the scapulae (coracoid process) in the shoulder joint. When in a spasm, the pain will be felt in the front part of the shoulder, the chest and down the inner arm to the fingers.
  • Latissimus Dorsi – This muscle originates in the lower back and is connected to the inside of the shoulder. When in a spasm the pain will be felt in the anterior part of the shoulder and the lower back.
  • Subclavius – This muscle is between the 1st rib in the front and the clavicle (collar bone). When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the anterior (front) shoulder, and down the arm to the fingers.
  • Biceps Brachi – This muscle is connected between t he arm and the forearm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and down the arm to the thumb.
  • Triceps and Anconeus – These muscles are connected between the shoulder joint and the posterior (back) forearm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and the back of the arm and forearm.
  • Coracobrachialis – This muscle connects the front tip of the scapulae (coracoid process) to the anterior arm. When in a spasm the pain would be felt in the shoulder and down the arm to the fingers.

Special thanks to Gadi Kaufman and GadiBody.com for the to work they’ve done in the gathering the information on this page.

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